Yeast press articles – starting a list…

 

 

 

 

 

So the press is starting to publish the yeast stuff. Below is a list (which I’ll add to) of articles that appear (some of which have interesting quotes – or misquotes…):

YNET

YNET (English)

Maariv

Jerusalem Post

Times of Israel

Times of Israel (2nd article)

Haaretz

Channel 1/Kan (Israel Broadcasting Authority) (with a nice promotional clip in Hebrew)

Beaumont Enterprise (based on AP)

Haaretz (English)

New York Times

BBC

Le Matin

Bloomberg

Jewish Press

CBN

Mako

Israel Hayom

Walla

Tablet

Foxnews

France24

Israel National News

Yahoo

Archaeology

Israel21c

CTV News

Japantimes

Nocamels.com

Ruptly

epa

UPI

Vos is Neias

Taiwan News

Citynews

Telegraph (but they didn’t mention BIU…)

LIFO

MSN.Com

 

First pictures from the yeast press conference

As previously mentioned, today we had a press conference on the yeast study. As you can see in the pictures below, quite a large group of journalists, from Israel and from the world, came to the conference, which was held in a very nice bar (Beeratenu) in downtown Jerusalem.

The journalists were very interested, took many pictures, conducted many interviews and asked a lot of questions, and rushed the bar when samples of the beer and mead that we made from the ancient yeasts was given out!

Stay tuned for the press about it. Should be cool!

Here are some pictures:

New paper on ancient fingerprints

A new “Safi paper” has just appeared, spearheaded by Kent Fowler, on identifying the age and sex of potters based on fingerprints.
The full title of the article is:
Fowler, K. D., Walker, E., Greenfield, H. J., Ross, J., and Maeir, A. M. 2019. The Identity of Potters in Early States: Determining the Age and Sex of Fingerprints on Early Bronze Age Pottery from Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory.
Here’s the abstract:
The organization of craft production has long been a marker for broader social, economic, and political changes that accompanied urbanism. The identity of producers who comprised production groups, communities, or workshops is out of reach using conventional archaeological data. There has been some success using epidermal prints on artifacts to identify the age and sex of producers. However, while age estimates are well developed, determining the sex of ancient potters is complicated by similarities between the prints of adult women and adolescents of either sex. Forensic research indicates that a combination of ridge breadth and density would best identify the age and sex of individuals. To this end, we propose an identification framework to classify fingerprints grounded in experimental and forensic research. In this study, we classify 38 fingerprints on Early Bronze Age (EB) III pottery from the early urban neighborhood at Tell eṣ-Ṣâfi/Gath, Israel. Mean ridge breadth (MRB) and mean ridge density (MRD) are used to distinguish the age and sex of prints after accounting for the shrinkage of calcareous fabrics used to make four type of vessels. We apply a modified version of the Kamp et al. (1999) regression equation to the MRB for each individual print. The MRD data are correlated to comparable data from populations with appropriate ancestry to infer sex. When the results are combined, our analyses indicate that two thirds of the
fingerprints were likely made by adult men and teenage boys and the remainder by adult women and adolescent girls. This result suggests that men or women were not exclusively making pottery at early urban centers in the Levant. This pattern contrasts a fingerprint study of post-state urban pottery production during the EB in northern Mesopotamia, which suggested women no longer made pottery after cities and states were established in the region.

Theme song for the 2019 season?

I think this can be the theme song for the 2019 season at Tell es-Safi/Gath:
Alice Merton – No Roots
And here are the lyrics:
I like digging holes and hiding things inside them
When I’ll grow old, I hope I won’t forget to find them
‘Cause I’ve got memories and travel like gypsies in the night
I build a home and wait for someone to tear it down
Then pack it up in boxes, head for the next town running
‘Cause I’ve got memories and travel like gypsies in the night
And a thousand times I’ve seen this road
A thousand times
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I like standing still, but that’s just a wishful plan
Ask me where I come from, I’ll say a different land
But I’ve got memories and travel like gypsies in the night
I count gates and numbers, then play the guessing game
It’s just the place that changes, the rest is still the same
But I’ve got memories and travel like gypsies in the night
And a thousand times I’ve seen this road
A thousand times
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I like digging holes
Hiding things inside them
When I’ll grow old
I won’t forget to find them
I like digging holes
Hiding things inside them
When I’ll grow old
I won’t forget to find them
I’ve got no roots
No roots
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots, but my home was never on the ground
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh
I’ve got no roots uh uh uh uh

Future meeting: “Monumentality in the Landscape” – October 30-31, 2019

Michel Freikman (a post-doc at Ariel University) and Kristina Reed (doctoral student at BIU) are organizing a conference entitled: “Monumentality in the Landscape”, which will be held at Bar-Ilan University and Ariel University on October 30-31, 2019. The RIAB Minerva Center will be a co-sponsor of the conference.

The conference plans to deal with issues related to the understanding of monumental
architecture in the context of the surrounding landscape. Topics related to the issue
include: degree of visibility of monuments in the ancient landscape and what the ways
are for a modern researcher to understand it, propaganda, ideology, and mythology
reflected through the prism of the monument, how a monument changes the landscape
around it, the phenomenon of nature as a focal point for ritual activity, and other topics
related to this field of study. This conference invites papers on a wide range of periods
from Prehistory to Ottoman.

Here is the call for papers for this very interesting conference: Monumentality in the Landscape Call 2019