re: Israeli archaeology and politics – claims and counter claims

In continuation of a topic that was broached awhile ago, about the alleged politicization of Israeli archaeology (and the book by N. Abu el-Haj on this topic and its critical reviews), Rafi Greenberg of Tel Aviv University has been extensively quoted in an article in the Haaretz, claiming quite similar claims, particularly against Israeli archaeological activities in the West Bank.

But this is not the end of the story!

Amnon Ben-Tor of the Hebrew University has published a short, but very pointed, reply to Rafi’s claims, and I must say that I fully agree with Amnon!

Aren

5 thoughts on “re: Israeli archaeology and politics – claims and counter claims

  1. Jim

    Joseph Lauer translated this last week, distributed it to various correspondents, and I posted a blog entry on it. It seems BAR simply lifted the translation from Lauer without attribution.

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  2. arenmaeir

    Jim,
    Thanks for the clarification. There is a saying in Hebrew: “He who says things in the name of that who said it (=giving proper credit for the saying – A.M.M.) brings salvation to the world!” ….

    Aren

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  3. arenmaeir

    Jim,
    Thanks for the link!

    It should be noted that Thomas Thompson has added a comment there that supports Amnon’s claims regarding the scientific accuracy of the Israeli surveys on the West Bank.

    Aren

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  4. Achish Melek Gat

    If I may be permitted … My own experience with the staff officer for archaeology in Judea and Samaria has been nothing but positive. I have done extensive research on a major West Bank site (Hebron, aka Tell Rumeide) and have found work done by archaeologists under the direction of the staff officer to be very accessible. In particular, an important LB tomb (located at the base of the tell, just outside the NW wall line of the ancient city) was excavated by a colleague working for the staff officer. I was provided with full information about that excavation, including a pre-publication copy of the report and all finds. This was granted to me with no restrictions, and I found the work performed to have been first class in terms of method and analysis. From my own experience, I would strongly support the proposition that archaeology in the West Bank (Judea/Samaria) is professional, open, of high quality, and without political bias or agenda. Yours Truly, Achish Melek Gat,
    aka Professor Jeffrey Chadwick, Brigham Young University

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