Bi-weekly lab talk on Kfar Menachem site

This last monday, Amit Dagan, one of the regular Safi staff, and graduate student at Bar-Ilan University, gave a talk about his MA thesis research, one of the regular bi-weekly talks at the lab.

Amit is researching and will publish the finds from a small site that is located about 1.6 km to the east of Tell es-Safi/Gath, which was excavated about 5 years ago by Yigal Yisraeli of the Israel Antiquities Authority. This site is apparently a small rural site dating to the Iron IIB (ca. 8th cent. BCE).

There are several things of interest at this site:
1) Its relationship to Tell es-Safi/Gath. In particular, since it dates to the 8th cent., AFTER the late 9th cent. BCE destruction of the site (when Gath loses much of its importance), what the character of this relationship is very interesting.
2) What activities were carried out at the site. The excavator, Yisraeli, suggested that there was evidence of pottery production. From Amit’s current analysis this is questionable, although without a doubt some very interesting production activities (currently un-identified) were carried out here.
3) The pottery is quite different from the 8th century BCE assemblage at Safi.

Amit presented a very initial overview of the architecture, pottery and other finds (including some very interesting small finds), as well as some of this initial thoughts on chronology, function, etc.

Eventually, the publication of this small, yet very interesting site, will provide some important insights on the rural surroundings of Tell es-Safi/Gath during the Iron Age II.

Aren

4 thoughts on “Bi-weekly lab talk on Kfar Menachem site

  1. Zach Margulies

    Sounds fascinating! After Gath fell, is there any indication that it was controlled by Israelites, or did it stay Philistine culturally?

    Like

  2. arenmaeir

    The excavations at Safi in Stratum A2 (8th cent.) indicate that there was a very strong Judean influence on the site, seen both in the clearly Judean style pottery, including LMLK handles. On the other hand, it appears that the population still ate pig, so it would appear that although the site was controlled by the Judeans (Hezekiah?) at least part of the population was still Philistine.

    Aren

    Like

  3. I’m curious, is it generally assumed among scholars that all residents of all Judean cities kept the law (particularly the kosher food law) all the time despite the fact that there were various sects worshiping idols all over the place?

    Like

  4. arenmaeir

    The “law” then was very different, and variable, then what we would ID as the “law” today. Also, how does one ID who is an Israelite and who is a non-Israelite in a city such as Gath. Nevertheless, in cities/sites in Israelite regions, there is very little evidence of the eating of pork. On the other hand, there is a LOT of what would in a later, post Iron Age perspective, be termed “idolatory” …

    Aren

    Like

Comments are closed.