Annual Conference of the Rennert Center for Jerusalem Studies

As I had mentioned about a week ago, this last Thursday (December 16th, 2010)the 16th Annual Conference of the Ingeborg Rennert Center for Jerusalem Studies was held at Bar-Ilan University.
The conference was very well attended, with a crowd of several hundred scholars and interested lay people. As in previous years, the conference organizers prepared the conference proceedings volume, in almost all of the papers that were presented in the meeting appeared in extended form in press (mostly in Hebrew, but with English summaries of most of the Hebrew papers).

I had the pleasure and honor of chairing the first session and unfortunately, had other commitments for the rest of the day that did not allow me to hear additional lectures. In the session that I chaired there were several interesting papers, including a paper by Z. Tsuck in which he suggested to identify a certain water cistern on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem as a cistern built in relation to the First Temple; and a paper by Gershon Galil in which he presented his reading of the Qeiyafa inscription. In fact, his paper in the conference proceedings is the first place where the full explanation of the reading has appeared in press (an English version will appear soon in Ugarit-forschungen). I must say, that by and large, I’m quite convinced by his reading – and he seems to very nicely answer the questions raised by various scholars after the preliminary reports on the details of his new reading.

Aren

10 thoughts on “Annual Conference of the Rennert Center for Jerusalem Studies

  1. It sounds like it was a lot of fun. I look for ward to reading the conference proceedings :).

    Sorry to nitpick again, but you wrote “by a large” instead of “by and large”.

    BTW, What was Dr. Barkai’s lecture about (I didn’t understand what the titel meant by the “end of a brilliant career”)?

    Shavua Tov

    Avi/AIWAC

    Like

  2. arenmaeir

    Thanks.
    Gaby spoke about how the excavations in Jerusalem ruined Kenyon’s career. I added after his talk that I thought that her excavations in Jericho (and the by and large poor publications) had already ruined it before she started in Jerusalem…
    Aren

    Like

  3. >>Gaby spoke about how the excavations in Jerusalem ruined Kenyon’s career. I added after his talk that I thought that her excavations in Jericho (and the by and large poor publications) had already ruined it before she started in Jerusalem…<<

    Could you elaborate?

    Like

    1. arenmaeir

      I think that her excavations at Jericho were in the end, a waste of good time and money, since the 5 volumes of publications on the excavations are quite useless (save for the first two that have a nice catalogue of objects from the tombs). The reports on the finds from the tell are so impossible to use and over detailed in the wrong details, that they are really only useful something to throw at someone – since they are so heavy (or as door stoppers, to put on seats so children can reach the table, etc.).
      Aren

      Like

Comments are closed.